The number of fixed speed cameras which are switched on in the Bristol area - Bristol Post

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A new bus rapid transit system BRT called MetroBus , is currently under construction across Bristol, as of , to provide a faster and reliable service than buses, improve transport infrastructure and reduce congestion. Archived from the original on 6 June Please organise more events like this, these days it's very hard to meet new people, and this event does this effortlessly. Archived from the original on 24 February The round piers predate the hospital, and may come from an aisled hall, the earliest remains of domestic architecture in the city, which was then adapted to form the hospital chapel.

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I hope she replies! Archived from the original PDF on 23 March I parked the bus near the Walled Garden and the complex of cottages in which most of the wedding guests had spent the previous night. Ding-Ding merrily on high…! DPA pumps appeared in the mid to late fifties on smaller engines, but this must surely have been one of the pioneer applications on a relatively large commercial vehicle engine. The bus itself was scrapped in Sept They also said they regularly review which fixed cameras are turned on.

There was no municipal involvement at Bath or Cheltenham. When the EHW series of Lodekkas appeared in , with CBC heating and hopper vents, there was a heatwave and reports of passengers passing out. I would have thought 17 years was a reasonable innings for a bus of this period. No doubt its 6LW engine would go on to give many more years service ploughing across the South China Sea! Was it that Gardner could not keep up with demands or was it a face saver for Bristol to have at least some Lodekkas with their own engines?

When running well the AVW was a good engine but unlike Gardners which just go on and on even with reduced performance AVW bottom ends tended to go bang with no warning. The BVW coming out at a time of heavier vehicles was never up to the job. The policy was that most vehicles were replaced at between 12 and 17 years. I think the reason was competition. Bristol had no competition whatever on urban services in Bristol, Bath, Gloucester, Cheltenham or Weston.

Philip, Bristol had a history of building its own engines right from the outset. A dozen engines were then produced in incorporating various modifications becoming the VW engine , before production started in earnest, with the engine becoming the more familiar AVW, a 6-cylinder 8. It developed up to bhp rpm, although operators could have the unit derated to give bhp rpm if required.

True the wet liners did require attention from time to time, as the neoprene sealing rings started to perish with age. It was advisable to replace sealing rings on all six cylinder liners even if only one was weeping, as the others being of similar age, would no doubt soon follow suit.

Yes it does sound like common sense but…….! Relating to the supply of Gardner engines, I think it is often forgotten that although Gardner was a premium engine builder, it did not only supply much of the bus and truck industry, but also supplied a sizeable section of the marine market as well.

This not only included manufacture of marine engines of various sizes, but also the manufacture of the reversing gear to go with them. Gardner at one point also had healthy orders for the supply of engines for mobile compressors and mechanical excavators.

Although Gardner did increase engine production over the years, I often wondered if maybe they just did not physically have the room for expansion at their Patricroft works. Most importantly there was a large canteen on the site, which I remember using on my first visit there as a WY apprentice more years ago now than I care to remember. The apple pie and custard was beautiful!

Thank you, Brendan, for your contribution on the BVW from someone with actual hands-on experience. These are always useful, informative and welcome. I would like to endorse what Alan W has said about the excellent contribution made by Brendan.

I was a regular user of the West Yorkshire Road Car Company services in the fifties and early sixties and know what an excellent bus fleet they operated with tight control from Harrogate.

They operated over avery wide area including urban routes in Harrogate, Bradford, Leeds, Keighley and York as well as many rural routes such as to the East Coast and Yorkshire Dales. I always regarded WYRCC as an ex Tilling flagship company with an intention to always have a modern image efficient fleet, so bus life generally was no more than 16 years.

Sadly all these wonderful attributes changed in with the imposition of the National Bus Company and later the demise of the Bristol Commercial Vehicle Company and Eastern Coach Works in the eighties was the final nail in the coffin. Richard, obviously some were better than others, but in general the same could be said about most of the former Tilling Group companies, it certainly applied to United Automobile Services in this area.

A few choice ones that are not fit for publication, but its strange how nobody seems to have a good word to say about that particular government folly. As for the demise on Bristol and ECW? After several years of development the end result was the Leyland National. How could they have spent so much time and money on development and got it so wrong. This is only my opinion. However, at the time I was a driver for NGT at their Percy Main Depot, although running at a profit was essential for the survival of the company, it was run by people who knew the bus industry, and our vehicles were well turned out and maintained to a very high standard.

Enter the new regime of NBC, they are run by government appointed accountants, most of whom have never been on a bus since they left school, but they know the price of everything and the value of nothing. They apply the principle of find the lowest common denominator, as a result, pride in fleets is destroyed, standards drop, and once well turned out fleets now just look shabby and neglected. Croda was a company supplying chemical products to the beauty products industry, and Wood was a believer in extracting high margins from modest sales volumes.

He brought the Croda creed to an industry of which he was totally ignorant, believing that those backward bus passengers required a bland, countrywide brand to become aware of the services on offer. Buses should be sold like supermarket baked beans by inventing a new, uniform, national identity. A public transport user in Aldershot could only then appreciate the "products" on offer if a bus passenger in Bristol or Buxton was given identical branding and operating standards. Crucially also, not just profitability but notably good margins to satisfy his political overlords were the prime objectives.

Cost control and corner cutting became paramount. As you can imagine, moving house causes a great deal of upheaval. Even now — six weeks after moving — we are still unpacking boxes! The pickup time was The most direct route was nevertheless a tortuous, rural one and my speed would rarely get above 30mph.

There was plenty of hedge-hugging, double-declutching and wheel-heaving! Briefly reaching 45mph, I soon went back down the box for the turning to Farrington Gurney, Midsomer Norton and Radstock. Somerset seems to have more than its fair share of double-barrelled place names and today I seemed to be visiting most of them! Finally, after passing through Buckland Dinham, I reached the imposing entrance to Orchardleigh House.

The drive up to the house is almost a mile long and passes through a golf course on the way. I parked the bus near the Walled Garden and the complex of cottages in which most of the wedding guests had spent the previous night. I caught up with some of them on the lawn and learned that the celebrations had started the previous evening!

Our buses are not decorated with ribbons as standard although I plan to change that eventually so some family members set to work with cream ribbons, bows and streamers of their own. As well as having a glimpse behind the scenes as the programme was being filmed, I also had the pleasure of conveying most of the Roadshow experts on the bus. But my abiding memory of the day was that it left me completely exhausted! I left home at As this was to be a very long duty, I had arranged for the bus ex-BOC Bristol Lodekka LC to be driven to an outstation just a couple of miles outside Minehead, which is where the programme was due to be filmed the next day.

As I drove up the M5 in the pouring rain my heart sank as I knew that the cab of this bus is not watertight in any way. Walking around doing my checks left me soggy and even the Bristol AVW engine seemed reluctant to start. My first task was to ferry the Antiques Roadshow experts from their hotel, where I also met my conductor Richard, to the West Somerset Railway station at Minehead.

It was strange to see them up close and to exchange a bit of banter about the wet weather. I was pleased to see in my mirrors as I slowly backed around a corner that a large part of the field had been recently covered with hardcore and stone chippings so, for the rest of the day, there were no problems getting in and out.

Briefly reaching 45mph, I soon went back down the box for the turning to Farrington Gurney, Midsomer Norton and Radstock. Somerset seems to have more than its fair share of double-barrelled place names and today I seemed to be visiting most of them! Finally, after passing through Buckland Dinham, I reached the imposing entrance to Orchardleigh House. The drive up to the house is almost a mile long and passes through a golf course on the way.

I parked the bus near the Walled Garden and the complex of cottages in which most of the wedding guests had spent the previous night. I caught up with some of them on the lawn and learned that the celebrations had started the previous evening! Our buses are not decorated with ribbons as standard although I plan to change that eventually so some family members set to work with cream ribbons, bows and streamers of their own. As well as having a glimpse behind the scenes as the programme was being filmed, I also had the pleasure of conveying most of the Roadshow experts on the bus.

But my abiding memory of the day was that it left me completely exhausted! I left home at As this was to be a very long duty, I had arranged for the bus ex-BOC Bristol Lodekka LC to be driven to an outstation just a couple of miles outside Minehead, which is where the programme was due to be filmed the next day.

As I drove up the M5 in the pouring rain my heart sank as I knew that the cab of this bus is not watertight in any way. Walking around doing my checks left me soggy and even the Bristol AVW engine seemed reluctant to start. My first task was to ferry the Antiques Roadshow experts from their hotel, where I also met my conductor Richard, to the West Somerset Railway station at Minehead. It was strange to see them up close and to exchange a bit of banter about the wet weather.

I was pleased to see in my mirrors as I slowly backed around a corner that a large part of the field had been recently covered with hardcore and stone chippings so, for the rest of the day, there were no problems getting in and out.

The destination was in Bath, which meant a mile empty journey from Weston-super-Mare. I knew it was going to be a cold day so I set out wearing lots of layers! Even so, I was beginning to feel chilly by the time I had finished my walkaround checks. She stood in the garage gleaming, wearing white wedding ribbons inside and out. A quick peep into the fuel tank with a torch revealed that she had been topped up to the brim with go-juice as well. Winter is the time when most of the heritage fleet is serviced, repaired or refurbished so the Bristol L was the only member of the fleet which was active.

However, the job involved transporting more than 60 people to the reception venue so a modern coach was to join me. As I drove out of the garage there was sleet in the air so I pulled on a pair of gloves and braced myself for a wintery blast through the cab. Several months have passed since my last duty with a heritage bus and even longer since my last stint in a Bristol L. So maybe I could be forgiven for a few graunchy gearchanges.

Fortunately, by the time I picked up my passengers, I was back in crashbox mode.

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speed dating bath bristol

The M4 motorway connects the city on an east-west axis from London to West Wales , and the M5 is a north—south west axis from Birmingham to Exeter. So, is Speed Dating for you?

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Thus, since wards do not have both councillors up for election at the same time, two-thirds of the wards participate in each election.

speed dating bath bristol

You can view comments from our previous guests and details about our MySpeedDate success guarantee. During the 20th century, Bristol's manufacturing activities expanded to include aircraft american man dating french woman at Filton by the Bristol Aeroplane Company and aircraft-engine manufacturing by Bristol Aero Engines later Rolls-Royce at Patchway. Although the Nails are cited as originating the phrase "cash on the nail" immediate paymentthe speed dating bath bristol was probably in use before their installation. The city has green belt mainly along its southern fringes, taking in small areas within the Ashton Court EstateSouth Bristol crematorium and cemetery, High Ridge common and Whitchurch, with a further area around Frenchay Speed dating bath bristol. Archived from the original on 24 July Retrieved 23 April